Anfield

 

The Belmont Road Picture House * Lido Cinema – Belmont Road

This was described in the press as one of the most handsome halls in Liverpool. It had 780 seats and a raked floor and opened the doors for the first time in 1914. The proprietors at the time were Belmont Road Picture House Ltd. The films where hired by the well known Liverpool film renters, the Weisker Bros. In those days films where silent so an orchestra played the music. At the Belmont the orchestra was so popular that it was retained longer than the majority of cinemas.

In 1938 it was renamed the Lido Cinema having been acquired by ABC. This ran as a cinema until 6th June 1959 and the last films were Streets of Laredo featuring William Holden and The Buckskin Lady.

The building received a new makeover and opened it’s doors once again in 1960 as the Wookey Hollow. It was closed in 1982 due to fire damage and reopened with the same name as a fun bar.

 

We used to go to the Lido when we were kids and we’d watch Roy Rogers and cowboys and Indians


“We used to run down the alley ways to get to the cinema me and my brother”

 
 

You can play each gallery by clicking on Start, and if you want to see the full sized photograph click on it’s title beneath each photograph.

Cinemas - Anfield - Belmont Picture House * Lido Cinema

Gaumont Palace – Oakfield Road

This cinema was also known as The Kings Hall Cinema and The Gaumont. Silent films continued here until 1930 with orchestral accompaniment until the talkies took over. They lasted for a year until the New Gaumont was built. This description of the auditorium taken from ‘Picture Palaces of Liverpool’ a book by Harold Ackroyd gives a insight into the glamour of cinemas.

“The foyer ceiling and beams were finished in soft iridescent metalled colours, the walls in tones of brown with touches of green and silver and window curtains of green silk. On leaving this seemingly sun-warmed atmosphere, one entered the 96′ by 72′ auditorium, likened to a rose-coloured drawing room – a drawing rook for 1,100 people downstairs and 500 upstairs. With the local press announcing on 21st December 1931 that Liverpool had received a Christmas gift of a luxurious new cinema”.

The last performance of this grand and beautiful cinema was on 26th November 1960 with The Unforgiven, starring Burt Lancaster. In the year 2000 it became a Community Centre and remains so to this date.

 

“I used to go with my brother I loved Shirley Temple films and he loved Cowboys and Indians so I had to put up with them”

You can play each gallery by clicking on Start, and if you want to see the full sized photograph click on it’s title beneath each photograph.

Take a look at the Flickr album;

Cinemas - Anfield - Gaumont Palace ( Gaumont * Kings Hall Cinema)

 

Mere Lane Picture House – Mere Lane

This was the last cinema opened during World War 1. This cinema opened in 1916, the proprietors were the W Gordon circuit also of the nearby Homer cinema and the Garrick.

In 1930 the Western Electric Sound System was installed and could accommodate an audience of 1,050. It changed hands a couple of times, 1933 by the Regent circuit, 1935 by Liverpool based Regent Circuit, 1938 W.Southern Morris and lastly 1954 Essoldo circuit.

CinemaScope was installed and Twentieth Century-Fox releases began in July 1955 with Garden Of Evil starring Gary Cooper and Susan Hayward. The final film shown in 1963 was Barabbas Anthony Quinn.

It was converted into a Bingo Hall and then, in 1992, a sports centre.

 

You can play each gallery by clicking on Start, and if you want to see the full sized photograph click on it’s title beneath each photograph.

Take a look at the Flickr album;

Cinemas - Anfield - Mere Lane Picture House

Victoria Cinema * Essoldo Cinema – Cherry Lane

The cinema cost £20,000 to build and was completed in November 1923. The Victoria Super-Cinema was artistic, attractive and imposing with a seating capacity of 1,378. In the first year however it made a loss of £1,300. Takings improved slightly with an additional attraction of Jazz nights Tuesdays, Fridays and a special on Saturdays by an augmented orchestra. 1930 saw the installation of sound equipment for the first talkie in 1930, King Of Khyber Rifles.  In 1939 CinemaScope was installed. Surviving for 8 years, The Essoldo was the last cinema in its district when it closed 31st August 1963.

 

You can play each gallery by clicking on Start, and if you want to see the full sized photograph click on it’s title beneath each photograph.

Take a look at the Flickr album;

Cinemas - Anfield - Victoria Cinema * Essoldo

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